Program Evaluation

Why Music?

Program Evaluation


Project TREBLE (Testing Resilience in an Ensemble‐Based Learning Environment) – a comprehensive longitudinal evaluation of Miami Music Project.

Project TREBLE is a recently completed a longitudinal study, funded by the Ware Foundation, which examined the impact of participation in Miami Music Project on positive youth development.

 

FIU‐BRIDGE is a multidisciplinary research institute at Florida International University (FIU) whose applied endeavors have focused on school‐ and community‐based health promotion, and the prevention of risk behaviors, particularly among youth at‐risk for alcohol or drug use problems, STIs, and/or problem behaviors. FIU‐BRIDGE’s home institution, Florida International University, is a large, urban, public, and is a federally accredited minority‐serving institution (MSI), and the seventh largest university in the U.S. Project TREBLE was led by Dr. Michelle Hospital, the Associate Director of FIU‐BRIDGE.

Project TREBLE represents the first comprehensive longitudinal evaluation of an El Sistema‐ inspired program in the United States. Miami Music Project’s El Sistema‐inspired ensemble‐based orchestral musical education programming promotes three critical features recognized as optimal for positive youth development programs: (1) positive adult‐youth relationships, (2) activities that build skills and, (3) opportunities for youth to utilize theses skills in community activities (Lerner, 2004).

Thus, a positive youth development framework guided the design of Project TREBLE, particularly with regard to how ensemble‐based musical instruction among at‐risk youth may cultivate a diverse array of mutually reinforcing talents and would allow youth to thrive, even in challenging environments. Specifically, using developmentally appropriate measures, we evaluated the impact of participation in the MMP program on factors associated with resilience, namely the Five Cs of positive youth development—Competence, Confidence, Caring, Character, and Connection. We also examined MMP’s impact on executive functioning, including working memory, as well as, youth psychological adjustment including social anxiety, impulsive behaviors, conduct problems, and hyperactivity.

 

KEY FINDINGS

Key Finding #1: MMP Students showed improvement across all Five Cs of Positive Youth Development. Specifically, MMP students showed statistically significant improvement in grit (i.e., Character), self‐efficacy (i.e., Confidence), goal‐directed hope (i.e., Competence), and empathy (i.e., Caring). Additionally, a majority of parents reported that their child’s academic grades improved (i.e., Competence) over the course of the school year and MMP students reported high levels of connection with their MMP Teaching Artists and the MMP program (i.e., Connection).

Key Finding #2: MMP Students showed better psychological adjustment. Specifically, MMP students reported statistically significant reductions in social anxiety and parents reported significant reductions in their child’s conduct and peer problems, hyperactivity, as well as, impulsive behavior over the course of the school year.

Key Finding #3: MMP students showed improved executive functioning. Specifically, MMP students showed statistically significant improvement in working memory over the course of the school year.

Key Finding #4: MMP Students showed significant enhancements in positive youth development and psychological adjustment when compared to the Non‐MMP Comparison students. Specifically, MMP students reported significantly greater increases in grit (i.e., Character), goal‐directed hope (i.e., Competence), and empathy (i.e., Caring) as well as, significantly greater reductions in social anxiety and impulsive behavior when compared to the Non‐MMP Comparison students over the course of the school year.

Key Finding #5: Parents of MMP students reported improvement in youth skills, attitudes and behaviors over the course of the school year. Specifically, most parents noted improvements in their children on intrapersonal (e.g., self‐motivation, self‐esteem, happiness) and interpersonal (e.g., cooperation, leadership, communication, behavior at home) factors and attributed these improvements to their children’s participation in the MMP program.

To request a full version of the Project TREBLE’s Final Report please email us at info@miamimusicproject.org